YES – we raise meat on our farm, and we love it and honor every meal that we partake from our beautiful pastured animals.  BUT, I also promote and enjoy many meals that are vegetarian, or meatless. I think it helps me to appreciate the abundance of animal proteins available in my diet even more.  And it is nice to have a recipe like this Roasted Root Veggie Stuffed Mushroom, that is so good with or without meat added.

This is a great recipe if you like to “go both ways”, ya know?  Add ground meat or sausage if you like!

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I came up with this recipe idea after a trip to the farmer’s market last weekend.  The market was near closing, and the farmers only had roots and greens left. Well, I love them, so I bought them. The only thing is, when I got home, they stared at me!

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I decided to wash and cook everything as soon as I came home from the market, before I put them in the refrigerator.  I knew I could use the cooked veggies in other dishes as the week went along, so this simplified the week’s menu.  This is such a time saver if you do it.

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I could eat roots and greens every day.  The earthy aroma and the dense textures make me feel like I am having a healthy portion of protein and the greens give that “Popeye” kind of feeling – like I may be ready to take on anything.

Sauteed beet greens and stems

I decided to chop those beautiful greens – the leaves and stems – that belonged to my beets, and saute them for my stuffed mushroom recipe, adding beautiful color, flavor and some serious nutrients to the already healthy meal that was coming together.

sauteed beet greens and stems.

The backbone of the “pilaf” that becomes the stuffing for the mushroom caps in this recipe comes from a healthy portion of cooked buckwheat groats.  Buckwheat, the nutty seed kernel of a grain that is not even related to wheat, has some amazing health benefits – it is a complete protein, is high in fiber, rich in phytonutrients, gluten-free and and good source of vitamins and minerals.  It has an earthy aroma and taste, so it pairs well in this recipe, but also is a great addition to your morning oatmeal and other cereals, your bread dough, and more.

buckwheat groats

The stuffed mushroom caps are so pretty as they go into the oven.

stuffed portabella mushroom

Served with a dab of goat cheese and a spritz of fresh orange, you have a lovely one-dish complete meal for a healthy weeknight supper.

Root vegetable stuffed portabello mushroom

And those leftover roasted veggies can show up throughout the week.  I’m thinking breakfast hash with eggs or atop a lovely spinach salad – just to get your own ideas rolling. Enjoy the bounty of your seasonal foods shopping trip all week long.

 

Roasted Root Veggie Stuffed Portabello Mushroom
 
This stuffed mushroom one-dish meal is a perfect week-night healthy menu, and is a great way to get a generous portion of vegetables into your day.
Ingredients
  • 2 large Portabello Mushroom Caps
  • 2 cup Assorted Root Vegetables
  • 1 tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 1 sprig Fresh Rosemary
  • ½ cup Sweet Onion
  • 2-3 clove Garlic
  • 2 cup Beet Greens
  • ½ cup Beet Stem
  • ½ cup Buckwheat Groats
  • 1 cup Vegetable Stock
  • 1 large Orange
  • 1 cup Garbanzo Beans
  • 2 oz Fresh Goat Cheese
  • ½ Orange
  • Salt and Pepper
  • Jerusalem Artichoke Pickles
Instructions
  1. For Buckwheat - Bring vegetable stock (or water) to boil on stovetop in a lidded saucepan. Add buckwheat and ¼ tsp salt and return to simmering boil. Cover and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to sit for 5 minutes before removing lid. Fluff with a fork and hold until ready to mix the pilaf.
  2. For Root Vegetables - Wash, peel and dice assorted root vegetables of your choice (carrots, turnip, rutabaga, celeriac). Add 1 Tbsp. Olive Oil and chopped, fresh rosemary and toss to coat. Place in a 400 degree oven on a shallow metal baking dish and roast for 30 minutes, or until tender and taking on a bit of color. A stir midway through will improve the color. Remove from the hot oven and hold until ready to mix the pilaf stuffing.
  3. In a heavy saute pan, place 1 Tbsp. olive oil and when warm, add chopped onion and garlic and saute until translucent and tender, about 4 minutes. Add chopped beet stems and saute for an additional 1-2 minutes. Finally add the greens and stir on medium heat until wilted and brightly colored, about 1 minute more.
  4. For the pilaf, combine contents of saute pan with roasted root vegetables and 1 cup cooked buckwheat. Stir over medium heat to warm through. Add garbanzo beans and fresh orange cubes, stirring to combine as you add salt and pepper to adjust seasoning.
  5. Place portabello mushroom caps in a deep sided roasting dish and spoon pilaf mixture until mounded onto each mushroom cap. Place in the oven at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes to heat through.
  6. Remove briefly from the oven and place a 1 ounce slice of goat cheese on top of mushroom and return to the oven for 3-5 minutes. To serve, place the stuffed mushroom and any extra pilaf from the roasting pan onto the dinner plate, or platter for the table, and spritz generously with fresh orange squeeze, seasoning with additional salt and pepper.

    If you have Jerusalem Artichoke Pickles, or pickles of your choice, add to the side of your plate and ENJOY!!
Notes
Before beginning, place all the vegetables, including the mushroom caps, in a basin of cool water. This simple step will hydrate and clean these gems from the earth and farm to insure your dish is free from sand that sometimes accompanies them.

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